QuickCharge: Nissan Leaf Visia (2013)

The Nissan Leaf has been available in the UK since 2011, but this year Nissan updated the car and released it in three new spec levels: Visia, Acenta and Tekna. These are roughly equivalent to the US levels of S, SV and SL respectively.

Mark Starts the Leaf Up!

Mark Starts the Leaf Up!

But what do Mark and Nikki think having just got behind the seat of the Visia – base level – spec car?

QuickCharge is the Transport Evolved show where your intrepid hosts get behind the wheel of a new car and record their first impressions to camera. Unlike our other shows, which are recorded on professional camera and audio equipment, QuickCharge is recorded in a quick’n’dirty style in order to truly capture our first impressions, unencumbered by camera equipment and sound checks.

Let’s have a look at what Mark thinks:

The Leaf Visia is available for an on the road price of £20,990 if you want to buy the car and batteries. If you’d prefer to rent the batteries, that price drops to £15,990. Both of these prices are after the UK Government grant is applied.

Battery rental prices are about on par with all other manufactures with monthly payments varying depending on distance travelled and length of contract. For example, on a three year lease, 7,500 miles per year will cost you £70/month while 12,000 miles will be £93/month.

For a ‘base level’ car, the Visia still contains some impressive features. As standard, this car will come with:

  • Keyless entry and start
  • Bluetooth enabled hi-fi system
  • Digitally controlled air conditioning and heating.
Nikki Sets the Charge Amount

Nikki Sets the Charge Amount

However the car does only come with 3.6kW charger onboard and with a blank panel where a Rapid Charger port should be. These can be added for more money: The Rapid Charger port will cost an additional £500 and a 6.6kW onboard charger will cost £850.

It is worth noting that when the onboard charger is upgraded, you will receive a Type 2 to Type 1 cable rather than a cable with a domestic plug on the end. The ‘lost’ cable can be purchased for an additional cost.

Here’s Nikki’s view of the car:

We’ll be bringing you our full review on the Leaf Visia soon. In the meantime, what do you think of the base model Leaf? Would you consider it? Let us know below.


Want to keep up with the latest news in evolving transport? Don’t forget to follow Transport Evolved on Twitter, like us on Facebook and G+, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

You can also support us directly as a monthly supporting member by visiting Patreon.com.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditEmail this to someonePin on Pinterest

Related News

  • Nigel Jones

    Interesting review. It’s good to have a lower entry level cost — though after driving my leaf for 1.5 years (it’s my only car) I definately would value the higher model’s heat pump, chademo & 32A chargennnOne question — I was slightly concerned about the lack of “kickdown” — I find this is so useful in eco mode on the gen.1 . Is it just different throttle mapping, perhaps more progressive over the last part of the travel, or is power actually restricted? Indeed I’d go so far as saying it’s a safety aid.nnnAlso how did you find acceleration etc generally. I know the motor is different. BMW seem to have kept to a decent performance route. I hope nissan haven’t calmed down the leaf too much. For me it’s definately part of the fun!

Content Copyright (c) 2016 Transport Evolved LLC