Steve Marsh’s Nissan LEAF Rolls Over 100,000 Miles, Still Going Strong

Earlier today, the odometer on the 2012 Nissan LEAF owned by Washington resident Steve Marsh will roll over from 99,999 miles to 100,000 miles, marking yet another milestone for Nissan’s all electric hatch.

On sale in the U.S. since late 2010, there are now more than 40,000 LEAFs on the road of America, but Marsh’s LEAF, purchased in 2011, is officially the highest-mileage.

Steve and his high-mileage LEAF, November 2011.

Steve and his high-mileage LEAF, November 2011.

Marsh, who purchased the LEAf as a money-saving exercise, drives 130 miles every day to and from work at Taylor Shellfish in Washington State. When his previous ride rolled over 300,000 miles back in early 2011, Marsh knew it was time to look for a new car. With 200,000 miles on every single car he’s ever owned, Marsh was no stranger to the gas pump. But with rising gas prices, he knew it was time to make a switch to electric.

Luckily for Marsh, his bosses saw the benefits of him going electric, and helped Marsh make electric driving practical by installing a charging station in the company parking lot. Despite some initial teasing from his work colleagues, Marsh’s unbelievably low operating costs soon made them sit up and take notice. After eleven months, he had covered 36,000 miles, more than many people do in three years. By June this year, he had covered 78,000 miles, losing his car’s first capacity bar days after hitting that particular milestone.

By this point, Marsh’s car had lost 17 percent of its original capacity, which, while it was well within the expected tolerances, meant that he was no-longer able to travel non-stop from home to work or vice versa without stopping for a quick top-up along the way. Mercifully for Marsh, his route includes part of I-5, a road already well supported by DC quick charge stations thanks to its status as part of the West Coast Electric Highway. A few minutes quick charging every day in each direction has enabled Marsh to continue his daily commute without having to resort to alternative transportation solutions.

Earlier this year, Marsh's Odometer read just 78,000 miles.

Earlier this year, Marsh’s Odometer read just 78,000 miles.

To celebrate the odometer adding another digit, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, State Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson and representatives from Nissan North America — along with local EV drivers from both Washington and Oregon — will convene to celebrate Marsh’s 100,000 gasoline-free miles.  And to make sure it didn’t happen before today, Nissan helped Marsh out by lending him a LEAF for a few days so that the odometer really does pass over 100,000 miles today.

While Marsh is believed to be the first U.S. driver of a 100,000 mile Nissan LEAF, we don’t think he’ll be the last: that’s because many LEAF owners who buy their cars as a second car for local trips soon find themselves making any excuse to leave the gas-guzzler at home and take the LEAF instead. And while the LEAF doesn’t travel anywhere near as far as say a Tesla Model S per charge, LEAF owners around the world are starting to explore their native lands in their LEAFs, aided in many areas by a rapidly growing network of DC quick charge stations.

Collaboratively, the Transport Evolved Nissan LEAFs — owned privately by Nikki and Mark’s separate families — have racked up around 82,000 miles. (Nikki’s LEAF is just about to hit 48,000 miles while Mark’s LEAF is sitting at 33,000 miles.) Even combined, we’re nowhere near Marsh’s impressive 100,000 mark.

But that’s got us thinking. How many miles would we get if we added up all the LEAF-miles driven by Transport Evolved readers? 800,000? A Million? Two?

Leave your odometer readings, and message of congratulation for Steve, in the Comments below.






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