Transport Evolved Electric Car News Panel Show 195: Lemon Grenades

On today’s Transport Evolved: Tesla’s new business leasing, the Lemon Law King, and how to get a Scottish council paid too much for a charging station. 

These stories and more, on today’s Transport Evolved, with Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield, Mark Chatterley and Kalle Centegren


Please note: 
Time stamps are given below in this font in the format [hh:mm:ss]

Welcome to the show! Today, Nikki and Mark are joined by wannabe EV owner Kalle Centergren.

If we had a pound — or a dollar — for every person we knew who liked electric cars and happened to be involved some way or other in space travel or airplanes, we’d be pretty rich. And  Kalle Centergren is one such guy. A self-confessed space nut and airplane technician, Kalle doesn’t own an electric car. But last year his girlfriend and he went on holiday to the Swiss Alps and decided to rent a Nissan LEAF as their transpiration choice.  Their resulting YouTube video is an excellent example of the capabilities of electric cars — and some of the things first-time EV drivers experience behind the wheel.  Kalle doesn’t own an EV, but said that he and his girlfriend are hoping to make more trips in an EV this year.

(You can follow Kalle Centergrn via G+ or his YouTube channel.)

Part 1

Tesla announces its business leasing program, how Teslanomics makes other EVs seem really cheap, General Motors invests $449 million in the next-gen Volt and two other EVs, and Nissan wins an award for being really, really green.


Earlier this week, Tesla announced its business lease program for companies wanting to add a Tesla Model S electric car to their corporate fleet. We examine the lease deal and ask if it’s going to make the Model S the ultimate company car?

Teslanomics, the art of making electric car lease plans look really, really cheap by including all the possible incentives and gasoline savings you can think of, might make the Tesla Model S business lease look like $408 a month. But if you follow the same logic for other electric cars on the market, you’re left with some really unbelievable balance sheets. We investigate further…


This week, General Motors announced a $449 investment program in electric cars, with an upgrade program planned for the Detroit factories where it makes the Chevy Volt, Opel Ampera and Cadillac ELR. It’s all for the second-generation Volt, we’re told, and two more unnamed plug-in models. What will they be like? We speculate.


Nissan is know for its environmentally-friendly LEAF electric car, but it’s about to win an award for its energy-saving credentials in its Tennessee factories. We investigate how it saved enough power to drive a Nissan LEAF around the world 40,000 times.

Ad Break: 

Please do watch as it helps support the show.

Part 2

How one Tesla Model S owner got more than they bargained for when hacking into their Model S, Nissan LEAFs get hate in California for travelling slowly in the carpool lanes, a Scottish council pays way too much for EV charging, and how electric cars are winning out over hybrids in the sales race.


Tesla Model S owners, like most other electric car owners today, like their gadgets. Some are even quite geeky, happily breaking out their laptops to see what lies beneath their car’s dash.

But one Model S owner who did just that got a nasty shock: Tesla politely asked them to stop hacking their car


There used to be a time when Toyota Prii were hated by Californian drivers… is this hatred now moving to the Nissan LEAF? 


How much does it cost to put in an electric car charging station? £10,000? Less? More? One Scottish council, which had promised to install quick DC rapid chargers, ended up paying £82,000 for four type 2, 7 kilowatt AC charging stations. We find out why. 


For ten years or more, hybrid cars have been seen as the pinnacle of green motoring by many people. As a consequence, they’ve also held the majority of green car sales. But is that crown about to be stolen by plug-in cars? We think so. Here’s why.

Ad Break: 

Please do watch as it helps support the show.

Part 3

The Lemon Law King is chasing Tesla, how Mitsubishi isn’t charging a premium for plug-in cars, Bentley announces a plug-in hybrid, and we ask if you’d like a Half-Bike.


Vince Megna, the self-proclaimed Lemon Law King, is chasing Tesla Motors under Wisconsin’s lemon laws. But while he’s throwing lemon grenades at Tesla, the Californian automaker publicly went on the record with some of their disagreements against his client’s claim.


Mitsubishi’s highly anticipated Outlander PHEV will go on sale later this spring in the UK at a price equal to one of Mitsubishi’s regularly-fuelled diesel outlander models. In other words, there’s no premium for the plug-in version. Is this the future for plug-in pricing models?


Bentley is known for its luxury, huge-engined premium cars. Not plug-ins. But this week, Bentley announced a plug-in luxury Mulsanne. Sadly, it’ll only get 30 miles on a single charge — but will anyone buy it? 

And finally…


We quite like two-wheels here at Transport Evolved, especially if they’re human or electric-powered. But what about three wheels? Enter the half-bike, a cross between a bicycle and a skateboard. And at $800 on kickstarter, would you want one?


No feedback this week — but do drop us a line at show@transportevolved.com, or fill out theContact Us form on our website!

Subscribe to the show via iTunes or Youtube.


Want to keep up with the latest news in evolving transport? Don’t forget to follow Transport Evolved on Twitter, like us on Facebook and G+, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

You can also support us directly as a monthly supporting member by visiting Patreon.com.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditEmail this to someonePin on Pinterest

Related News

  • Espen Hugaas Andersen

    The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV seems to be approaching success in Norway, at least. Sales thus far:nnJanuary: 45nFabruary: 135nMarch: 258nnFor comparison, the statistics as of the 31st of March show that 365 Prius Plug-In have been sold, along with 243 Opel Ampera. Those numbers are quite extreme, as they mean that the Outlander sold in greater numbers in March than the Ampera has done over the past two years. The Outlander PHEV really seems like the car that will make plug-in hybrids popular in Norway.nnAnd that’s despite there being basically no incentives. The Outlander starts at 73,500 USD, whereas the Model S starts at 77,300 USD.

Content Copyright (c) 2016 Transport Evolved LLC