Tesla Announces Infinite Mileage, 8 Year Warranty For Tesla Model S Drivetrain

Car review and valuation site Edmunds.com had no end of problems with theirs — and some Tesla Model S owners report working their way through up to six of them — but now the drivetrain of the luxury Tesla Model S 85 kWh electric sedan is covered by a new, ‘infinite mileage’ warranty.

The Tesla Model S has just been given a retrospective, 8-year, unlimited mileage warranty.

The Tesla Model S has just been given a retrospective, 8-year, unlimited mileage warranty.

Announced late yesterday by Tesla Motors [NASDAQ:TSLA] CEO Elon Musk in a blog post on the Tesla Motors website, the new warranty will protect all Model S cars for an unlimited number of miles for eight years from any problems with its drivetrain.

The Model S first entered into production in 2012 and to date more than 40,000 cars have been produced at its Fremont facility in California. But while many Tesla Model S owners report having very few problems with their cars, others have seen drivetrain after drivetrain fail.

The failures, covering everything from excessive noise to the car stopping at the side of the road with a dashboard warning, were previously covered by Tesla under a four year, 50,000 mile warranty.

In his blog post however, Musk argued that because electric cars featured fewer moving parts, were mechanically simpler and more reliable than gasoline vehicles, the warranty period should reflect that.

Tesla's new drivetrain warranty means any new Model S 85 owner won't have to worry about drivetrain faults for 8 years.

Tesla’s new drivetrain warranty means any new Model S 85 owner won’t have to worry about drivetrain faults for 8 years, regardless of car mileage.

To that end, Tesla has now extended the drivetrain warranty of Model S electric cars fitted with an 85 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack to an unlimited number of miles — something Musk cleverly calls an ‘infinite’ warranty.

Like Tesla’s infinite mileage battery warranty, which covers the massive 85 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack from defects or massive loss in pack capacity, Tesla’s new infinite mileage drivetrain warranty doesn’t run forever.

Instead, the warranty will cover all Tesla Model S 85 cars ever made — right back to models made in 2012 — from the point of manufacture until its eighth birthday. Model S cars fitted with the smaller 60 kilowatt-hour battery pack will get a new 8-year, 125,000 mile warranty.

This means that those with 2012 model year cars still have six years of drivetrain warranty left, regardless of how many miles their car drives.

While the term ‘infinite mileage’ is a new one to us here at Transport Evolved, many mainstream automakers already offer extensive unlimited mile warranties on their new cars. Kia, for example, has been offering a 7-year, unlimited milage warranty on all of its cars for just over seven years, the longest warranty period on a traditional gasoline-powered vehicle we know of.

Tesla’s new warranty is one year longer.

60 kilowatt-hour Tesla Model S cars are covered by an 8, year, 125,000 mile warranty.

60 kilowatt-hour Tesla Model S cars are covered by an 8, year, 125,000 mile warranty.

The new announcement is bound to be welcomed by Tesla owners worldwide, although we do wonder how owners who have already paid for Tesla’s extended mileage warranty will be feeling right now. Presumably in the interests of customer satisfaction, Tesla will be looking at ways to ensure those customers are not left out of pocket by the new retrospective warranty.

As for the name of the new warranty? Here at Transport Evolved we’re a little disappointed that Tesla has chosen to use the term ‘infinite’ to label it, especially given Musk’s dealings with the massive, immeasurable vastness of space.

To us, the word ‘infinite’ means something which is without boundaries, something immeasurable or without any limits.

Tesla’s new drivetrain warranty, while the largest we’ve ever seen, is most certainly not unlimited or limitless.

Sorry, Elon.

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  • Michael Thwaite

    Hmm, I wonder how this might affect Roadster owners. The extended warranty was too rich for me but I still have my car serviced annually. I don’t drive my car very often as I know that a failure in the drivetrain or power electronics would effectively spell the end. Could I start using my Roadster again knowing that Tesla would help me out in the event of a major electronics or drivetrain issue?

  • Guest

    Typo in title: infinitie. This comment will self destruct in 5, 4, 3, 2, …

  • Esl1999 .

    Either, Elon got two of his jobs mixed up, or it was a clever tie-in to Space X. In my opinion, Tesla is trying to be different from all the other auto manufacturers. “unlimited” is just so everyday. How do you go even bolder? Infinite mileage. Apparently, Infiniti Motors, on future warranties, will be using your spelling of the word “infinitie” for obvious reasons.

  • vdiv

    The warranty should count from the time of delivery, not the time of manufacture.nnJust for a reference the Voltec powertrain/electronics warranty has been 8 years/100,000 miles from the beginning.

  • Teo

    Nikki,nnFirstly, I don’t see a reason to be so picky about the wording. It is just a blog post. If you go to Tesla’s Design Studio page it says “8 year, unlimited mile battery and drive unit warranty”. http://www.teslamotors.com/models/designnnSecondly, I don’t understand this sentence at all:nn”Teslau2019s new drivetrain warranty, while the largest weu2019ve ever seen, is most certainly not unlimited or limitless. Sorry, Elon.”nnTesla never claimed the warranty is unlimited. Where did you read that? The blog post certainly doesn’t say that. It says “Infinite Mile Warranty”. It doesn’t say “Infinite Warranty”.nnYou are not doing yourself any favors with this careless article. If you are trying to be funny, that is not funny.nnWhy not talk about how different and better Tesla is than other car companies? Tesla didn’t have to implement this retroactively. They didn’t have to honor the warranty when the car is sold. Why not talk about how this change will benefit current and future Tesla owners because the resale value of the Model S has just increased because of this change. nnTo me it looks like you have difficulty following what is going on. The average Model S owner knows more. This is a poor article.

    • Teo

      Here is an example of a good article on the same subject:nnhttp://www.techtimes.com/articles/13236/20140817/elon-musk-announces-tesla-model-s-infinite-model-year-warranty.htm

      • Teo, nnnThanks for the comments. nnActually, I’m not sure Tesla is doing anything differently when it comes to the warranty. Nissan recently enacted a retrospective battery warranty for its LEAF — and many other companies do long warranty periods too. nnnYou’re right: part of this is nomenclature. Infinite implies never-ending — when it is temporally limited. Other automakers do it too — and it’s always bugged me. nnnThanks again for your comments. They’re always welcome.

        • Teo

          Nikki,nnNow I feel sorry for being too harsh on you. I apologize.nnI like this website and I would like it even more with less distractions and more excitement in the articles. I think Tesla has been nothing but a dream car company so far with everything they have done. While other car companies fiddle around with low range compliance cars, Tesla is making amazing electric cars. nnBy the way if you are not already listening to Elon Musk’s conference calls, I recommend listening to those. There is so much information there. I’m sure you will find there a lot of ideas for new articles. nnFor example in the latest conference call on 31 July 2014 Musk explained why drive train replacements were mostly a non issue. nnHe also talked about other things that I found exciting. For example he said within 10 years batteries will reach a price point when electric cars will become cheaper to manufacture than petrol cars. nnTo listen to the conference calls you can enter any name and email address after you click on the webcast link on this page: nnhttp://ir.teslamotors.com/events.cfm

    • Orris

      Nikki,nnWhat is the point of this article really?!?nnOrrisnSeattle, WAn

  • WeaponZero

    “As for the name of the new warranty? Here at Transport Evolved weu2019re a little disappointed that Tesla has chosen to use the term u2018infiniteu2019 to label it, especially given Musku2019s dealings with the massive, immeasurable vastness of space.”nnnWasn’t the use of the word infinite a pun on the buzz lightyear statement “to infinity and beyond”?nnnWhile Musk does own a space company, he is also deeply tied to the movie and gaming industry so he often uses puns from those. Kind of like on the patent thing where he wrote “All our patents belong to you” which was a pun on the game “All your bases belong to us”nnAlso, some states let you get a prorated refund on the warranty. That said, the warranty also covers other things, not just the drivetrain.

  • Kennez Zell

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