2015 Volkswagen e-Golf Electric Car Priced in U.S. From $36,265

Ahead of its official launch in the U.S. later this fall, Volkswagen North America has announced official pricing of its all-electric 2015 e-Golf.

Based on the same Volkswagen MQB chassis as the rest of the 2015 Volkswagen Golf lineup, the 2015 Volkswagen Golf will go on sale in November for $35,445 before incentives, plus $820 in mandatory destination and delivery charges.

Priced to compete directly with the Nissan LEAF SL, the 2015 Volkswagen e-Golf offers a similar spec, range, and capability

Priced to compete directly with the Nissan LEAF SL, the 2015 Volkswagen e-Golf offers a similar spec, range, and capability

Capable of a claimed range of between 70 and 90 miles per charge depending on driving style — official EPA rating hasn’t been released yet — the 2015 Volkswagen e-Golf is powered by an 85 kilowatt electric motor and 24.2 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack.

Unlike Europe, where the e-Golf is available in a variety of different trim levels, the U.S. market e-Golf will only be available in top-spec SEL trim. This means its spec list includes electrically heated windshield, heated front washer nozzles, dual-zone air conditioning, LED headlights and daytime running lights, leatherette seats, full satellite navigation, 7 kilowatt on-board charger, touch-screen infotainment system with satellite radio, and of course, remote telematics.

In addition, the U.S.-spec e-Golf comes with DC quick charger connectivity, courtesy of a Combo CCS charge socket. Capable of refilling the e-Golf’s battery pack from empty to 80 per cent full in 30 minutes or so, the CCS socket functions in a similar way to the CHAdeMO DC quick charge port found on the 2015 Nissan LEAF, although we should note the two standards are not interoperable.

The Volkswagen e-Golf will initially only be on sale in select U.S. states and markets.

The Volkswagen e-Golf will initially only be on sale in select U.S. states and markets.

Taken as a whole, the 2015 Volkswagen e-Golf is not only similarly priced to the top-spec 2015 Nissan LEAF SL, but is similarly specced, both in terms of on-board convenience and technology as well as range and performance.

Add a more advanced range of drive modes over the LEAF — the e-Golf has three levels of driver-selectable regenerative braking as well as three different driving profiles for maximum control of range and performance — the e-Golf may entice some would-be LEAF owners to buy a Golf instead.

More convention in its appearance than the U.S.-made LEAF, the e-Golf will also appeal more to those who want an electric car but don’t want to mark themselves out as doing so on the morning commute or in the company parking lot.

Sadly however, the e-Golf will remain something of a limited-market car for the foreseeable future, with Volkswagen currently planning to launch it in a handful of key markets — including California — making it more of a compliance car than an easily-obtainable all-electric people’s car for the time being.

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  • Wondering if VW will adjust placement of the eGolf charge-port opening relative to driver positioning (RHD vs. LHD) for the different markets? Seeing LHD (Lefthand Drive) US model pictured with right-rear charge-port access seems like a bit of an ergonomic oversight. nnSomehow I can see eGolf drivers hopping in, realizing their eGolf won’t go into gear because they forgot to unplug the cord from the blind-spot on the opposite corner of the vehicle. Cheers to VW for getting eGolf drivers to run a lap around their PEV each morning. #morningexercise by design 😉

  • Ed Logan

    I like the look way better than the Leaf.nnBiggest problem i see is the CCS DC charging. According to plugshare there are two stations on the east coast. nnAre VW and other manufacturers that support the CCS standards going to install more charging stations? If the answer is no then I’d take the uglier looking Leaf that has quick charge support.

    • tech01xpert

      Instead of 45 kW DCFC of any sort, how about 20 kW J1772? The EVSE costs $2,200 (Clipper Creek CS-100).nnAll short range BEVs should come with 10kW or 20kW L2 charging. At least the Mercedes Benz B-class comes with 10kW. 20kW is a sweet spot because it’s 100A electricity service which means it can be installed relatively cheaply (relatively cheap EVSE, wiring, 208/240v single phase service) which means it can be installed all over the place. Charge to full on a 25-30kWh pack in just over an hour.nnThe BMW/Bosch CCS charger delivers 24kW at $6500 + installation in comparison. A total rip off in comparison. Further, that EVSE will only charge CCS at that price. J1772 80A will deliver 20kW for cheaper and still charge pretty much any EV, although at a lower rate.nnOf course, this is all U.S. specific. In other parts of the world, the electrical standards and costs are very different.

  • Dean Hamer

    7kw OBC?nnWhy isn’t this available to EU spec E-Golf’s?