Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-in Hybrid Approved for Japanese Vehicle-to-Home Use

Mitsubishi’s Outlander Plug-in Hybrid, the world’s first plug-in hybrid with CHAdeMO DC quick charge technology fitted as standard, has just been given official approval in Japan to operate as an emergency backup power supply for Japanese homes fitted with the SMART V2H (Vehicle-to-Home) power system.

The SMART V2H protocol makes it possible to use electric cars -- and now the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV -- to power your home.

The SMART V2H protocol makes it possible to use electric cars — and now the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV — to power your home.

Designed by a consortium of electric vehicle manufacturers and utility companies in Japan, the SMART V2H system allows anyone with a compatible CHAdeMO-equipped car the ability to power their homes directly from their car in the event of a brownout or natural disaster, providing a week or more of emergency power for basic lighting and cooking.

As GreenCarCongress reports, the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is the first plug-in hybrid to be approved to work with the various SMART V2H systems currently on the market in Japan. Previously, only Nissan’s LEAF electric car and e-NV200 electric van, along with the Mitsubishi iMiev electric car were approved for use with SMART V2H installations.

It’s worth noting however, that while the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV does have an on-board gasoline engine which can provide motive power alongside its 12 kilowatt-hour on-board lithium-ion battery pack, the crossover SUV’s engine is disabled while it is plugged into a DC quick charging station or SMART V2H installation.

The Mitsubishi Outlander's 12 kilowatt-hour battery pack can be accessed via its CHAdeMO socket for use with SMART V2H Systems

The Mitsubishi Outlander’s 12 kilowatt-hour battery pack can be accessed via its CHAdeMO socket for use with SMART V2H Systems

On paper, this means that the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV can only be used to provide around twelve kilowatt-hours of electricity in an emergency situation. Since the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has a ‘battery charge’ function however,  it’s theoretically possible to provide far more than twelve kilowatt-hours of electricity in an emergency by disconnecting the car from the SMART V2H system each time the Outlander PHEV’s battery pack is depleted, using the gasoline engine to recharge the battery pack before then reconnecting the car to the home.

With various SMART V2H systems now available on the market in Japan — including ones made by Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Nichicon and Tsubakimoto — the inclusion of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV to the list of approved vehicles will dramatically increase the number of potential plug-in owners in Japan who can power their homes in an emergency solely on the energy stored in their cars.

Behind the small panel in the upper-left corner of the Toyota Mirai's trunk is a CHAdeMO DC connector. It will presumably also be approved for use with SMART V2H systems.

Behind the small panel in the upper-left corner of the Toyota Mirai’s trunk is a CHAdeMO DC connector. It will presumably also be approved for use with SMART V2H systems.

And with the Toyota Miria due to launch early next year — which also has a CHAdeMO DC power socket hidden in its trunk to allow it to operate with SMART V2H appliances — Japan looks to be the most readily-prepared off-grid capable nation in the world, at least when it comes to emergency low-emission backup power.

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