Expecting News on the Next-Generation Nissan LEAF Electric Car? You’ll Have To Wait

On the market since late 2010, the all-electric Nissan LEAF is currently the world’s most popular electric car, with well over 150,000 LEAFs sold to date worldwide. More than four years after it first went on sale however, LEAF fans are eager to hear what Nissan has planned for the next-generation car, which is likely to hit the market late next year as a 2017 model-year car.

Thanks to the unexpected unveiling of the 200-mile Chevrolet Bolt Concept Car at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show and subsequent confirmation at last week’s Chicago Auto Show that GM would bring the four-seat, long-range subcompact to market by the end of next year, the pressure on Nissan to give more details about its next-generation plug-in is rising, but Nissan says fans wanting to know more about the second-generation model it’s currently working on will just have to wait a little longer.

While we don't know what the next-generation LEAF will look like, Nissan says it will be less geeky.

If you’re expecting Nissan to drip-feed information on the next-generation LEAF like GM did with the 2017 Chevrolet Volt, you’ll be in for a wait.

Unlike GM and the second-generation 2016 Chevrolet Volt — which was teased by GM for nearly six months before its official unveiling in January — Nissan is keeping quiet until at least the Summer, says Autobloggreen’s Sebastian Blanco, who spoke to Nissan’s Brian Brockman at last week’s Chicago Auto Show.

“Of course things are in the works,” said Brockman when pushed on the status of the all-new LEAF. But while Nissan is happy to admit the next-generation LEAF is nearing production, it isn’t about to let slip just what the next-generation car will have under the hood. Or rather, under the floor.

We already know from previous comments made by Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn that the 2017 Nissan LEAF will double existing LEAF range, resulting in somewhere between 150 miles of real-world range and perhaps a theoretical maximum of 200 miles or more per charge, depending on the existing range estimate you choose to double.

We also know that Nissan is considering wireless charging for future models, thanks to former Nissan executive Andy Palmer. Nissan has also admitted that the next-generation LEAF will be less nerdy and more mainstream than its predecessor.

Nissan remains tight-lipped on this car's successor.

Nissan remains tight-lipped on this car’s successor.

While Nissan executives are happy to talk concepts however, they’re not ready to tie anything down. And perhaps with good reason: when GM started nearly six-months of pre-reveal press surrounding the next-generation Chevrolet Volt, sales of the outgoing 2014 and 2015 model year Volts dropped off a cliff.

In not disclosing anything about the next-generation LEAF, not even a launch date, Nissan is insulating itself from a similar effect with its number one plug-in.

What would you like to see in the next-generation Nissan LEAF? Do you think Nissan will be threatened by the new Chevy Bolt? Or will it be able to match its closest rival mile for mile and dollar for dollar?

Leave your thoughts in the Comments below.

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