Mitsubishi Unveils All-Electric eX Concept Crossover SUV at Tokyo Motor Show

Following on the heels of the unveiling of Nissan’s all-electric concept cars at this year’s Tokyo Motor Show, rival automaker Mitsubishi has unveiled its own all-electric vision for the future in the form of a long-range crossover SUV called the Mitsubishi eX Concept.

The Mitsubishi eX features a spartan, yet comfortable interior.

The Mitsubishi eX features a spartan, yet comfortable interior.

Like the Nissan IDS Electric concept car we told you about yesterday, The Mitsubishi eX Concept is a fully-autonomous car capable of keeping both its occupants and those outside the car safe at all times. Powered by twin electric motors — one for each axle — the eX Concept also offers the same kind of off-road capabilities as the Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-in Hybrid, but does so solely on electric power.

Despite having modest off-road capabilities however, Mitsubishi is clear that the eX Concept car is most certainly more at home in the urban jungle. Referred to by Mitsubishi as being reminiscent of a “shooting brake” with “compact SUV lines,” the eX wears the same grille as the new 2016 Outlander, complete with large C-shaped trim pieces, narrow, angular LED headlights and tall indicator clusters inset into the bumper.

The eX Crossover Concept evokes the design language of other Mitsubishi vehicles.

The eX Crossover Concept evokes the design language of other Mitsubishi vehicles.

As is the case with many concept cars, Mitsubishi isn’t particularly forthcoming on the specifics of what’s under the hood, but does hint at a next-generation lithium-ion battery pack located under the floor which it says provides a cruising range of 400 kilometers (250 miles). Given the eX Concept is getting its public debut in Tokyo, we’d guess that means 400 kilometers on the overly-optimistic JC08 test cycle. Given the same test cycle rates the outgoing 24 kilowatt-hour Nissan LEAF as having a rang eof 224 kilometers per charge (142 miles), a figure more than 58 miles more per charge than the official, achievable real-world EPA test figure of 84 miles per charge, we’d caution that the eX Concept’s real world range would likely be nearer to 150 miles per charge than it would the 250 miles suggested by Mitsubishi.

Extrapolating that further, and giving Mitsubishi a little artistic license in terms of the lightweight materials used in the car’s construction, and we’d guess the battery pack powering the eX Concept would need to be somewhere between 50 and 60 kilowatt-hours in the real world to yield the claimed range.

As with many other electric autonomous concept cars of late, the eX Concept features a coach-door design, with the lack of B-pillar opening up the interior of the vehicle and evoking a futuristic, airy quality inside the cabin.

Meanwhile, Mitsubishi hints that the eX Concept promises a future where its vehicles are fully connected to the outside world. Using an always-on Internet connection, the eX can offer both the best in entertainment to its passengers as well as benefit from a cloud-connected autonomous vehicle intelligence. In this way, the eX can avoid accidents and heavy congestion and even pass on details about changes in the weather to other connected vehicles on the road.

Do you like the Mitsubishi eX Concept? Do you think Mitsubishi will bring such a vehicle to market in the near future? Or are you less than convinced that this particular concept car will become a vehicle you would want to buy?

Leave your thoughts in the Comments below.



Want to keep up with the latest news in evolving transport? Don’t forget to follow Transport Evolved on Twitter, like us on Facebook and G+, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

You can also support us directly as a monthly supporting member by visiting

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditEmail this to someonePin on Pinterest

Related News

  • vdiv

    There are hints of the Evoque in the styling. Hope Mitsu makes it.

Content Copyright (c) 2016 Transport Evolved LLC