Is the 2017 Toyota Prius Prime a Compliance Car Or a Decent Plug-in You Should Consider?

The 2017 Toyota Prius Prime is Toyota’s second plug-in hybrid variant of the popular Prius hybrid. But can the new plug-in hybrid — which now has its own separate name and appearance distinct from the main Prius liftback — help Toyota make up for the anemic performance and mediocrity of the previous generation Prius Plug in Hybrid?

Watch the review above to find out.

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  • Albemarle

    I find it fascinating how the phrase ‘compliance car’ is so damning. If a car was a compliance car but good enough to be purchased in California, how does that imply any failure of the car? Are Californians particularly poor judges of cars, do what they buy show them to be incompetent? In Ontario, we get some compliance cars such as the Spark EV and Focus EV. Although they are sold by only a few dealers, people who buy them are happy customers.

    This ‘compliance’ thing is like the word ‘liberal’ in your politics. Outside the States, no one gets the insult.

    • Martin Lacey

      Compliance car should mean availability limited to the ZEV mandated States, however the term “compliance car” has become synonymous with a compromised EV. In my view any EV with an engine is a compromise designed to massage the overall fleet mpg for CAFE compliance.

      • William

        An EV with an engine is just a hybrid. There’s nothing wrong with hybrids.

        • Martin Lacey

          On that we differ in our opinions.

          Hybrids are nothing more than a temporary fix to fleet mpg improvements and are used by manufacturers to delay EV production in meaningful numbers.

  • Martin Lacey

    EV with ICE component = compliance!

    • EV with ICE component = compromise!

      And there is nothing wrong with compromises.

      PHEV’s sell well outside the USA where the concept of a ‘compliance car’ is unknown.