What Does an Electric Car Revolution Need? 40 Gigafactories, Says VW

Earlier this year, Tesla CEO Elon Musk proclaimed that in order to move the world’s energy and transportation needs away from fossil fuels completely and onto clean, renewable sources of power, some one hundred Gigafactory-style facilities would have to be built around the world to produce all of the batteries that transition required.

At the end of last month, Volkswagen’s boss of Research and Development Ulrich Eichhorn made a similar prediction, claiming that if the entire automotive industry turned its fleet one quarter electric by 2025, a total of 40 Gigafactory facilities would need to be built globally.

But is that estimate accurate? Is it too high or too low? And what would a larger fleet of electric vehicles look like for the lithium-ion battery industry?

Watch the video above to find out, leave your thoughts in the Comments below, don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, and support our show through Patreon.

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  • Albemarle

    I think most manufacturers will migrate to owning their own battery facilities. It is such a major part of an EV. They will outsource initially until the chemistry and production methods settle down and they have a handle on volume.

    I think this because manufacturers continue to insist on making their own turbocharged 2 litre engines, when they are virtually a commodity and could be churned out more economically for everyone by one supplier. It is not even a marketable product differentiator. For this reason I have no expectation that they will act differently with batteries.

  • Farmer_Dave

    A great major for college students to select would be electrical engineering as an undergraduate and chemical engineering as a second undergraduate degree. If really ambitious, go for graduate work at Dalhousie University where they research advanced battery chemistry.

    BTW Nikki, the Tesla Gigafactory is east of Reno, not north.